About

Religion & Literature is a scholarly journal providing a forum for discussion of the relations between two crucial human concerns, the religious impulse and the literary forms of any era, place, or language. We publish articles, review essays, and book reviews three times a year. R&L began publication in 1984, succeeding NDEJ: A Journal of Religion in Literature (1977-1984). A program in the study of Religion and Literature is housed in the College of Arts & Letters of the University of Notre Dame.

Current Issue, Volume 44.2 (Summer 2012)

This issue features five excellent articles on topics as diverse as the Restoration poet Joseph Beaumont to the theological virtues in The Road to contemporary western Sufism, a forum edited by Sara J. van den Berg, and book reviews. The forum features essays by Thomas D. Zlatic, Paula McDowell, Twyla Gibson, Sheila J. Nayar, and Jerry Harp.

Article Authors

Alexander T. Wong, “‘Dainty Martyrdom’ and ‘Hot Devotion’ in the Verse of Joseph Beaumont (1616–1699)”
Humberto Garcia, “Blake, Swedenborg, and Muhammad: The Prophet Tradition, Revisited”
D. Marcel DeCoste, “‘A Thing that Even Death Cannot Undo’: The Operation of the Theological Virtues in Cormac McCarthy’s The Road
Kate Zebiri, “‘Holy Foolishness’ and ‘Crazy Wisdom’ as Teaching Styles in Contemporary Western Sufism”
Evan Chambers, “Re-Opening Dictée: Interpreting the Void in Theresa Cha’s Representations of Christianity”
Sara J. van den Berg, ed., forum, “Walter J. Ong Yesterday, Today, Tomorrow: A Special Centenary Forum”

Other Contributors

Mary C. Erler, Samuel Fanous and Vincent Gillespie (eds.)‘s The Cambridge Companion to Medieval English Mysticism
Mary Ellen Lamb, Tiffany Werth’s The Fabulous Dark Cloister: Romance in England after the Reformation
Robert Whalen, Ryan Netzley’s Reading, Desire, and the Eucharist in Early Modern Religious Poetry
James Kearney, James Simpson’s Under the Hammer: Iconoclasm in the Anglo-American Tradition
Steven Marx, Travis de Cook and Alan Galey (eds.)‘s Shakespeare, the Bible, and the Form of the Book: Contested Scriptures
Angelica Duran, Peter E. Medicine, John T. Shawcross, and David V. Urban (eds.)’s Visionary Milton: Essay on Prophecy and Violence

Mark Knight, Michael Tomko’s, British Romanticism and the Catholic Question: Religion, History, and National Identity, 1778–1829
Janet Todd, Laura Mooneyham White’s Jane Austen’s Anglicanism
Craig Woelfel, Pericles Lewis’s Religious Experience and the Modernist Novel
Christina Bieber Lake, John J. Han’s Wise Blood: A Reconsideration
Joeri Schrijvers, Tamsin Jones’s A Genealogy of Marion’s Philosophy of Religion: Apparent Darkness
Brett Foster, Hannibal Hamlin and Norman W. Jones (eds.)’s The King James Bible after 400 Years: Literary, Linguistic, and Cultural Influences

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News and Events:

Conference: Dante’s Theology (London)
The Devers Program in Dante Studies at Notre Dame and the Leeds Centre for Dante Studies invite registration for the conference “Dante’s Theology in Poetry, Practice, and Society” to be held at the University of Notre Dame in London, June 13-14, 2013. Learn more.

Conference: Dante’s Theology (Jerusalem)
Italian Studies at Notre Dame invites applications for “Dante’s Theology: An International Summer Seminar on the Theological Dimensions of Dante’s Work” to be held at the Tantur Ecumenical Institute in Jerusalem, June 17-28, 2013. Learn more.

Religion and Literature Lecturer: Richard Strier
This year’s Religion and Literature Lecturer is Dr. Richard Strier, currently Frank L. Sulzberger Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus at the University of Chicago.

  • Recent Issues:
    Volume 42.1-2 (Spring-Summer 2010)

    This special double issue, guest edited by Kathryn Kerby-Fulton and Jonathan Juilfs and titled “‘Something Fearful’: Medievalist Scholars on the Religious Turn in Literary Criticism,” collects essays by a range of scholars reflecting on the challenges encountered by professionals whose religious views inform and shape the questions that anchor their own scholarly investigations.
    Learn more.
  • “What Is Religion and Literature?”
    Volume 41.2 (Summer 2009)

    This special issue brings together thirty-three scholars from varying literary and religious specialties to reflect on the study of religion and literature. Contributors respond to a brief prompt: "What does the phrase ‘religion and literature’ denote? May religion and literature be constituted as a field, and if so, how? What is, or should be, or could be, the relationship of studies in this area to other areas of literary, theological, and/or religious inquiry? Learn more.
  • Recent Conference:
    “The Hospitable Text”
    14-16 July 2011
    London Notre Dame Centre
    United Kingdom

    This conference will bring together a wide variety of scholars in order to enable and enrich contemporary explorations of religion and literature, recognizing the importance of talking further about different approaches to the field. Contemporary theorists and theologians have paid considerable attention recently to the idea of hospitality, recognizing among other things the value of actively hosting viewpoints different from their own rather than merely tolerating their presence. Learn more.
  • To receive announcements about the publication of new issues, join our e-mailing list.
    Send an e-mail to randl@nd.edu indicating your interest. Announcements will be sent 3-4 times per year.

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Upcoming Issue:

44.3, featuring articles from

  • Anthony Domestico, “The Twice-Broken World: Karl Barth, T. S. Eliot, and the Poetics of Christian Revelation”
  • Darlene Kelly, “From Chance Encounter to Discipleship: Gabrielle Roy’s Teilhardian Journey”
  • Michael Roeschlein, “Theatrical Iteration in Stoppard’s Arcadia: Fractal Mapping v. Eternal Recurrence”
  • Paul Tewkesbury, “Thematizing the Beloved Community: Echoes of Martin Luther King Jr. in Bebe Campbell’s Your Blues Ain’t Like Mine
  • Plus a forum on “Acknowledged Convictions” in the study of medieval literature and religion in response to the special issue 42.1–2 (spring–summer 2010), edited by Katy Wright-Bushman with Robin Kirkpatrick.